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    Car Insurance - credit where it is due

    As you probably know, and as reported in various posts here, there is a potential problem with thieves stealing cars by using equipment to boost the signal from key fobs when these are located away from the car. And then being able to access and start the car. Sorry if that is not exactly technically correct but you know the issue.

    Anyway, I received this morning in the post a package from my insurer Direct Line, which has enclosed in it a Faraday pouch. Direct Line covering letter suggests that if my keys are kept in this pouch the thieves could not steal the car using the method above. I believe the principle is sound but I have no idea if the one provided is up to the job.

    Bur credit to Direct Line for trying to do something. You may wish to take into account when renewing your insurance.

    #2
    Originally posted by IanLondon View Post
    As you probably know, and as reported in various posts here, there is a potential problem with thieves stealing cars by using equipment to boost the signal from key fobs when these are located away from the car. And then being able to access and start the car. Sorry if that is not exactly technically correct but you know the issue.

    Anyway, I received this morning in the post a package from my insurer Direct Line, which has enclosed in it a Faraday pouch. Direct Line covering letter suggests that if my keys are kept in this pouch the thieves could not steal the car using the method above. I believe the principle is sound but I have no idea if the one provided is up to the job.

    Bur credit to Direct Line for trying to do something. You may wish to take into account when renewing your insurance.
    I use a a metal tin but completely agree with you

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      #3
      Nice touch from the insurance company - for anyone using any pouches to block the signal, please donít forget about the spare keys and check the pouch is still doing its job maybe once a month. They have been know to fail after a period of time all depending on how well made they are.


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      2011 ROUSH Stage 2 Mustang
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        #4
        If only someone could invent a handy storage spot for said fob in the car. Perhaps a metal key shaped thing that just possibly could operate some type of mechanical lever that would prevent the steering wheel from being turned.

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          #5
          Originally posted by richard View Post
          If only someone could invent a handy storage spot for said fob in the car. Perhaps a metal key shaped thing that just possibly could operate some type of mechanical lever that would prevent the steering wheel from being turned.
          I have one of those on my 64.5 only thing is any metal key will work it
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          2012 Dodge Challenger SRT8 6.4 Hemi Yellow Jacket
          2011 ROUSH Stage 2 Mustang
          1964.5 Vintage Burgundy 164hp 260ci V8 Convertible

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            #6
            Up until the mid 90s the average scrote was quite skilled in car theft with a short length of scaffold tube and flat head screwdriver . Then the coded key was invented and it became very hard to nick a car without a key. You had two lines of defence electronic and mechanical. Now they've removed the mechanical deterrent so the now tech savvy tossers only need to get through the electronic side and they're away.
            Can you believe that if you were to now buy a modern fast Ford that you also have to resurrect your krooklock or great big locking steering wheel disc from decades ago-no thanks- get it sorted.

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              #7
              From what I've read, Ford have introduced a new security measure to the keys, now they no longer transmit after they are left alone for 40 seconds or so and will therefore sit dormant overnight until you move them or pick them up again. Simple but clever.
              1969 302 Fastback

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                #8
                Originally posted by JAR View Post
                From what I've read, Ford have introduced a new security measure to the keys, now they no longer transmit after they are left alone for 40 seconds or so and will therefore sit dormant overnight until you move them or pick them up again. Simple but clever.
                Yes and due to be rolled out to Mustang owners over the next two years at a cost - Latest Ford Fiesta and Focus models can have security upgraded with replacement fobs, priced from £65 (Fiesta), £72 (Focus) plus 0.9 hours labour to programme and test. This is available to owners of the current Fiesta, which has been on sale for two years, and of the Focus introduced last year. Over the next two years Ford will be rolling out the same motion-sensor technology across its other carsí key fobs. That was from Ford in April this year.
                Editor Round Up
                2012 Dodge Challenger SRT8 6.4 Hemi Yellow Jacket
                2011 ROUSH Stage 2 Mustang
                1964.5 Vintage Burgundy 164hp 260ci V8 Convertible

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                  #9
                  Originally posted by IanLondon View Post
                  As you probably know, and as reported in various posts here, there is a potential problem with thieves stealing cars by using equipment to boost the signal from key fobs when these are located away from the car. And then being able to access and start the car. Sorry if that is not exactly technically correct but you know the issue.

                  Anyway, I received this morning in the post a package from my insurer Direct Line, which has enclosed in it a Faraday pouch. Direct Line covering letter suggests that if my keys are kept in this pouch the thieves could not steal the car using the method above. I believe the principle is sound but I have no idea if the one provided is up to the job.

                  Bur credit to Direct Line for trying to do something. You may wish to take into account when renewing your insurance.
                  That is a good idea from Direct Line, costs them next to nothing and comes across as good customer service.
                  I am sure that all manufacturers could make their cars more secure but can't be bothered, doesn't matter to them if its stolen as they hope you will go and buy another one.

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