Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Mustang SUV - Mach E

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Bearintown
    replied
    Originally posted by ALLAN R View Post
    I don't think its all about range, I think with an EV its a case of having to manage the "fuel store". I can get in my petrol car to do a long range journey with no fuel in the tank but I can stop at a petrol station and fully charge the vehicle in about 5 minutes. Also if the journey is longer than the cars range then I can stop at another petrol station and fully recharge in 5 minutes. Range and fuel planning just isn't an issue. With an EV forward thinking is necessary to ensure the vehicle is charged for the journey, and it is not really practical to recharge during a journey because of the charging time. Further there are presently not that great a number of charging stations in any particular area. Also the number of charging points with have to far exceed the present number of fuel pumps if EV's are going to become mainstream. My local petrol station has 8 pumps and if each car takes 5 minutes at the pump the station can fully charge 96 cars per hour. With EV's and 8 charging points that would probably be 8 vehicles in about 8 hours - there's just no comparison.
    Thats a very good point Allan! If a motorway service station has say 10 points and an average quick charge is 30 minutes thats not a lot of cars per hour compared to the through traffic.
    Half the car park would have to be set up to charge if they become popular, and the cheap charge would soon be offest by having to put 30 minutes in a motorway cafe!

    Leave a comment:


  • ALLAN R
    replied
    I don't think its all about range, I think with an EV its a case of having to manage the "fuel store". I can get in my petrol car to do a long range journey with no fuel in the tank but I can stop at a petrol station and fully charge the vehicle in about 5 minutes. Also if the journey is longer than the cars range then I can stop at another petrol station and fully recharge in 5 minutes. Range and fuel planning just isn't an issue. With an EV forward thinking is necessary to ensure the vehicle is charged for the journey, and it is not really practical to recharge during a journey because of the charging time. Further there are presently not that great a number of charging stations in any particular area. Also the number of charging points with have to far exceed the present number of fuel pumps if EV's are going to become mainstream. My local petrol station has 8 pumps and if each car takes 5 minutes at the pump the station can fully charge 96 cars per hour. With EV's and 8 charging points that would probably be 8 vehicles in about 8 hours - there's just no comparison.

    Leave a comment:


  • Bearintown
    replied
    Originally posted by G19 View Post

    Don't want to worry you but the extended range model MACH-E is said to be 370 miles RRP 50,190
    In the scale of the stupid SUV's she likes thats not toooooo bad
    Lets see real world range figures b4 I get another Mustang

    Leave a comment:


  • mad4v8
    replied
    You're right about the first gen Leaf, someone I used to work with had one for a Demo a while ago, 40 miles was about it's real max across Derbyshire.

    Daughter in law has the Second gen, about 2 years old.
    The battery is bigger in that and the new current Leaf the battery is even bigger.

    They've had to keep their old Peugeot 2008 for long distances.
    She mainly had the Leaf as her employer (Local authority) has some E.V. only parking bays with free charging and she always struggled to park.
    Now she's guaranteed a parking spot.
    Additionally they pay a slightly higher mileage rate for E.V for business use.

    E.V is a stop-gap as far as I can see

    Leave a comment:


  • ALLAN R
    replied
    Originally posted by mad4v8 View Post

    The newer chargers are Wifi connected (assuming your house has it) and reduce charging or switch off altogether if the local supply is on high demand.
    Presumably they reduce charging when known high demand occurs like in the Ad breaks for Soaps or Football.

    Daughter in law has just had a Pod Point 7kw 32amp Smart charger fitted for their Nissan Leaf.


    And yes, street light circuits wouldn't cope with a charger on every post, maybe a 3kw top up just on 1 post in the area.
    This just substantiates what I was saying. Unless there is a major rebuild of our power grids then not everyone will be able to have an EV. This way we will go back to the beginning of motoring where only the rich will have cars if ICE cars get banned. Can't see it happening myself, we are too reliant on cars.

    People need to read some "Which" reports on EV's. They are good as urban shopping trolleys but not nearly so good on faster roads or motorways. I read that the first generation Leaf came down to 40 miles on the motorway with a bit of heating and headlights. Also aircon will really sap power, more so than heating.

    Leave a comment:


  • mad4v8
    replied
    Originally posted by ALLAN R View Post
    The next level is the 32 amp charger which requires a special socket but if everyone in the locality wants one and plugs their car in the local sub station will likely not cope.
    The newer chargers are Wifi connected (assuming your house has it) and reduce charging or switch off altogether if the local supply is on high demand.
    Presumably they reduce charging when known high demand occurs like in the Ad breaks for Soaps or Football.

    Daughter in law has just had a Pod Point 7kw 32amp Smart charger fitted for their Nissan Leaf.


    And yes, street light circuits wouldn't cope with a charger on every post, maybe a 3kw top up just on 1 post in the area.

    Leave a comment:


  • Anaconda
    replied
    Just like mpg the range is hypothetical and not based on reality. Winter and hills will reduce range by a long way.

    Leave a comment:


  • G19
    replied
    Originally posted by Bearintown View Post
    Couldnt imagine the wife ever being arsed to plug one in tbh lol.
    The lack of parking outside peoples house will eliminate haft the country from buying one.
    I personally would have one if we could get the realistic range up to at least 350. Thats what I need to get to say Manchester airport or a gig on an evening.
    Don't want to worry you but the extended range model MACH-E is said to be 370 miles RRP 50,190

    Leave a comment:


  • GeoffW
    replied
    Can't see a street lamp having wiring capable of charging a car, they're were only designed to run a light bulb. Round here they're cast iron ones that have probably been there since before the war.

    Leave a comment:


  • ALLAN R
    replied
    My brother applied to make a drop down kerb to get his car into his garden some years ago. This was refused by the council. He recently reapplied saying it was to allow for charging of his, to be purchased, EV and got permission. Now with a drop down kerb he can park his 911 in his garden???
    I think the whole thing with EV's has not been thought out. At home you can use a 13 amp charger off a mains socket with no problem. The next level is the 32 amp charger which requires a special socket but if everyone in the locality wants one and plugs their car in the local sub station will likely not cope. Local councils will not allow cables to be stretched across foot paths. If they do I will deliberately fall over one and claim - I should get loads of petrol money out of that.

    Leave a comment:


  • mike67fb
    replied
    Originally posted by G19 View Post
    With regard charging Ford believes 95% of vehicles will be charged either at home or at a place of work. An optional extra will be a Ford Connected Wallbox which offers greater convenience and faster charging times than a domestic socket. Figures quoted are 27 miles of range every hour compared to 8 miles of range per hour from a normal home socket, so in theory a full charge can be obtain overnight with the Wallbox. Personally I still wonder how this would work if you don’t have a driveway or worse still cannot park outside your own house. I am also not sure what a friend/relative might say when you go to visit them and asked to plug in your car to get a charge for the drive home.
    The UK isn't setup to support electric vehicles, many people do not have offstreet parking adjacent to their house and have to park some distance from home....

    When I lived in London I had a flat in a Victorian block where there were essentially 2 parking spaces on the road outside for 8 flats, this was repeated the whole length of the road. I used to have to drive round the local streets for at least 10-15 minutes trying to find a space then walk home from wherever I'd parked. I actually remember one morning after being ill for a few days walking round in circles as I couldn't remember where I'd parked a few days before!

    Here's an example of someone who can't park outside their house running cables down the road:

    https://www.examinerlive.co.uk/news/...c-car-14552658

    And guidance from Hampshire council to not lay cables across pathways and to use a cable protector:

    https://www.hants.gov.uk/transport/e...rging-guidance

    Cable protectors like that will likely only cause a nuisance to those in wheelchairs or with other mobility issues.

    I once heard someone talk about installing kerbside charging points fed from streetlights, that might work for one or two vehicles but is going to need a huge upgrade to the street lighting infrastructure to support loads of vehicles all charging overnight with the combined power draw.

    That's not to consider the health and safety implications and aesthetic challenges of kerbside charging points all along the pavement, especially where again we have streets that were never designed for vehicles with extremely narrow pavements.

    I'll look to be proven wrong but electric cars will always be a niche and won't replace traditional cars, some other alternative is needed.

    Leave a comment:


  • Bearintown
    replied
    Couldnt imagine the wife ever being arsed to plug one in tbh lol.
    The lack of parking outside peoples house will eliminate haft the country from buying one.
    I personally would have one if we could get the realistic range up to at least 350. Thats what I need to get to say Manchester airport or a gig on an evening.

    Leave a comment:


  • G19
    replied
    A little update on the Mustang Mach-E after attending a very professional presentation to members of the public at a local dealership by Ford.

    The vehicle was a pre-production unit and was the one which had been on display at Ford Dunton Technical Centre. If we can get over the fact it has been badge and called a Mustang the car itself looks good up close and does have a few Mustang lines incorporated within the look of the vehicle. It is a lot smaller than you would expect for an SUV and despite the car having a panoramic glass roof the interior of the car looks quite dark but did appear to have a lot of room inside. The car has two displays the main one being a 15.5” display, which may make the interior look lighter when on, maybe once viewed outside the cabin might be a lot lighter in natural daylight. Starting price for the RWD Mach-E will be 40270 for a standard range of 280 miles.

    With regard charging Ford believes 95% of vehicles will be charged either at home or at a place of work. An optional extra will be a Ford Connected Wallbox which offers greater convenience and faster charging times than a domestic socket. Figures quoted are 27 miles of range every hour compared to 8 miles of range per hour from a normal home socket, so in theory a full charge can be obtain overnight with the Wallbox. Personally I still wonder how this would work if you don’t have a driveway or worse still cannot park outside your own house. I am also not sure what a friend/relative might say when you go to visit them and asked to plug in your car to get a charge for the drive home.

    As a pre-production unit the car looked well put together and felt solid when opening and closing doors, tail gate and bonnet. Storage space did not look that large in the boot for a five passenger seating car, addition storage is available in the front of the car but is not particularly large and when the car goes into production their might be an option for it to be a cold/hot storage area.

    The First Edition (priority build) is still available for pre-orders but has limited availability. In the States the First Edition is officially full with a quarter of all reservations coming from California.

    Back to the branding and clearly Ford see this SUV as a performance car and part of the Mustang family. I don’t think the general public or those buying the car will mind it being called a Mustang but certainly existing Mustang owners and enthusiasts may take some convincing in the way the name has been used.

    The club committee will be meeting in the first quarter of this year when the Mach-E will be up for discussion.

    Leave a comment:


  • AMBullitt
    replied
    Thanks Allan

    Leave a comment:


  • ALLAN R
    replied
    Originally posted by AMBullitt View Post
    Agree Alan

    so how was the meeting, sorry was up north so could not attend

    MarkT
    The meeting was good. Minutes will be put up on the members section of the forum. Essentially the club had a very good year with membership up on last year, with a lot of people joining at the Excel and NEC shows. Lots of successful events in 2019 including the Santa Pod meeting which will be repeated in 2020. I wont say more as I don't want to steal anyones thunder.

    As for the Mach E I did raise this topic and the general feeling in the meeting is that whilst the car is not in the same mould as the Mustang has been todate it is a Ford car and it has the Mustang name so essentially it has to be accepted in the club. This said the committee took an action to discuss the things further and (I think) issue an "official" club response.

    Leave a comment:

Working...
X