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Oil separator which side in UK

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    Oil separator which side in UK

    Hi all

    After many years of admiring the Mustang I'm now the proud owner of a 2016 GT, and after just two weeks I'm absolutely loving it. I've already fitted the Roush axle back, front parking sensors are booked in for next week and now looking at an oil separator. There seems to be many types on the market and lots of views as to which is best, guess I'll take a punt on one. My question though is which side should these be fitted in the UK? Drive side, passenger side or both? Your views would be very welcome.

    #2
    Originally posted by Wavey66 View Post
    Hi all

    After many years of admiring the Mustang I'm now the proud owner of a 2016 GT, and after just two weeks I'm absolutely loving it. I've already fitted the Roush axle back, front parking sensors are booked in for next week and now looking at an oil separator. There seems to be many types on the market and lots of views as to which is best, guess I'll take a punt on one. My question though is which side should these be fitted in the UK? Drive side, passenger side or both? Your views would be very welcome.
    By oil separator is that the same as a catch tank?

    If yes, personally I've never seen the purpose of them; if they were needed, the manufacturer would have fit them IMO (as Porsche did); unless you plan to track/pod the car a lot I'd not even contemplate fitting one..... so I'm afraid I can't give any advice on which side you should fit one..

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      #3
      spend your money on something more useful for your car, waste of money unless you race it as above....or if you just want to waste money on under hood bling feel free. In which case best spot is one that gives you the most direct route to the block drain back or wherever your tapping it into to return the oil. Hot vapor travels quite freely, cold liquid is a lot more subject to gravitational forces, so if you have a kink in the pipe its not going to flow up and over then back down.....
      Instagram link - https://www.instagram.com/chevelle_hell/

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        #4
        Worth it on a supercharged car...

        On my 07 and 13 GT500s the passenger side fills in 2000 miles or less but the driver's side stays clean unless you really push it, as in fast twisty mountain roads in Europe.

        On a normally aspirated car I don't see them doing anything.

        Malc
        2005 GT 4.6, 2007 GT500, 2013 GT500 (present car).
        3mustangs by Malc May, on Flickr

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          #5
          You will catch oil on the driver's side (RHD ;-)) which would otherwise end up in your inlet. I fitted the Ford Performance one, which I guess they wouldn't make if it didn't have a purpose. You don't need one on the pass (nearside) unless you are tracking or boosting. The Ford one looks OEM; because it is.

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            #6
            I have oil separators, one on my Ecoboost PCV side, and two on my S197. The Ecoboost has a small amount every time I check it and the S197 has a small amount in the drivers side only. Only once have I had some in the passenger side of the S197 when razzing it on the motorway.

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              #7
              A catch can is adventagous if you are revving high often, oil will end up in your induction system and eventually your throttle body, never good. Especially useful when running any induction mods, cai, tb, im, tvs, etc. Just my .02
              2015 Mustang GT Premium - MBRP Street Cat-back - American Racing Drag Wheels

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                #8
                To be fair, oil vapours WILL get into your intake system and engine under normal operation not ONLY when revving hard or racing etc.

                That is the whole point of engine cam cover and crankcase breathers.

                Since the early sixties all car engines have been designed to deliberately direct oil vapours into the engine intake to then get burnt off in the exhaust.

                The main issue is with the buildup of oil inside the intake piping and manifold. During the normal operation of an engine the excess blow-by and oil vapors from the crank case are allowed to enter the intake system. The oil mist cools and layers the inside of the intake piping and manifold. Over time this layer can build up and thick sludge can accumulate.

                This has been made worse with the introduction of the Exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) system on more modern cars. The oil vapors can mix with the re-circulated exhaust gasses and soot which then builds up on the intake manifold and valves etc. This layer over time hardens and thickens repeatedly. It will then begin to clog up the throttle body, swirl flaps, or even the intake valves on direct injected engines.

                Having a buildup of sludge can cause lower performance due to the limiting effect it has on the air flow to the engine. If the buildup becomes excessive on the throttle body it can cause poor idling as it can block the air flow whilst the throttle plate is shut.

                Fitting a catch tank (can) will reduce the amount of oil vapor reaching the intake tract and combustion chamber. Without the oil vapor the soot from the EGR valve will not congeal so much on the intake which will keep the intake from becoming clogged.



                Manufacturers do not fit them purely for cost measures, think of the extra costs involved in fitting one to every engine in every car ?

                Also think of the lost revenue in repairing damaged engines etc?
                Last edited by Kona_Chris; 01-09-2020, 07:28 PM.

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                  #9
                  Bit of hose, and a Coke tin, tie wrapped somewhere handy?

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                    #10
                    I had one fitted to my S197 (fitted by previous owner), in the 8 years it was on there it was bone dry and as clean as a whistle. So from that I came to the conclusion its just another shiny bit of bling which has very little purpose, if any.

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                      #11
                      Originally posted by Anaconda View Post
                      I had one fitted to my S197 (fitted by previous owner), in the 8 years it was on there it was bone dry and as clean as a whistle. So from that I came to the conclusion its just another shiny bit of bling which has very little purpose, if any.


                      Had one on my S550 for a month and already have a couple of millimetres of oil in the bottom.

                      Maybe the newer engines need them more than the older ones.

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                        #12
                        Originally posted by Kona_Chris View Post



                        Had one on my S550 for a month and already have a couple of millimetres of oil in the bottom.

                        Maybe the newer engines need them more than the older ones.
                        Certainly looks that way.

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                          #13
                          I have one fitted and over the 6 month of use as i dont bring it out in winter month on these welsh roads i get half a catch tank of oil so for me worth itas car is modified and is driven hard and raced ,there was a pic on forum somewhere of my tank with the oil ,
                          sigpicUpgrades = Saleen supercharger kit with JDM tune, 3.4 pulley ,Keene bell boost a pump, BBK 62mm Twin Throttle body with spacer, EBC drilled vented & grooved discs up front with red stuff pads all round , Boost gauge and fuel psi gauge ,Oil seperator, Extra 5" fans for heat exchanger, 7 row oil cooler , Braided steal brake hoses all round, BMR rear lower control arms. 481Bhp Total. & all the normal refinements you get with a Saleen mustang. production number 192 of 945 for that year.

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                            #14
                            I recently installed the simple UPR one from Nemesis. Build quality is amazing. It just clips in place with Continental hoses which are so strong, no additional hardware is required. I would usually default to Ford Performance but it's not compatible with the GT350 throttle body in PP2 (gets too crowded in that area).

                            Just a couple of pointers. It needs to go the correct way around as it has a valve, and that isn't clear in the instructions or mentioned on the various videos. Also, like many American suppliers, they refer to 'passenger side' as if LHD cars are the only cars in world (infuriating). However, just to be clear, it goes on the dirty side which is our driver's side / off-side / right when driving!

                            In terms of does it work, I did 250 miles of motorway driving after installing it and it captured maybe a quarter teaspoon of oil, which I'd rather have in a can than back in the intake.

                            I wondered if they are not fitted as standard because of one of the rulings (California is very strict) and the thought that you may pour the oil down the drain. Also, it's an additional service requirement - If you never emptied it, it would become an issue once full!

                            Cheers
                            David
                            David & Kathy
                            2018 GT Auto (pre-facelift)
                            Also running 57 Zephyr, MGB and some Mopar stuff!
                            Member A602's CC
                            Pictures on Instagram @flat_top_david

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                              #15
                              Mines fitted now :



                              WD

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