Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

1968 289 - Electronic Fuel Pump PSI

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    1968 289 - Electronic Fuel Pump PSI

    On my Mustang I currently have a clear plastic fuel filter going between the pump and carb and when I've got the engine running, the petrol seems to run into it not a lot faster than a trickle, although it runs fine even when I'm pulling the throttle to bring the revs up. A mechanic friend of mine suggested I should do away with the mechanical pump and put an electric one on as it's probably better anyway so my question is, what PSI should the petrol flow at for a 1968 289 V8?

    Thanks!

    #2
    You need about 4-7psi for a std carb. Here is a good electric pump that I have on my 65 289 car (http://www.realsteel.co.uk/section6.pdf). Look at the Airtex pump on page S6/15. It is a nice quiet electric pump and mine was fitted back in the 90's and s still going strong - also way cheaper and quieter than the Holley pumps. I would put a large inline filter between the pump and the tank and I also have another at the carb. I have only ever had to replace the one at the tank as it does get some debris in it over about a year period and it protects the pump.
    Allan

    Comment


      #3
      In my opinion if it aint broke........!!!

      Comment


        #4
        Originally posted by custom Brett View Post
        In my opinion if it aint broke........!!!
        Couldn't agree more. If the mechanical pump is fine leave it alone, if it's faulty, replace it with another mechanical pump.

        Phil


        Classic American Restoration Services
        01992 890969..............07590 431511
        www.totalmustang.co.uk ... www.philsworkshop.co.uk
        https://www.facebook.com/classicamer...rationservices

        Comment


          #5
          Though I agree with keeping it original, surely petrol should be flowing to the carb at more than a trickle?

          Comment


            #6
            The float needle valves control the flow of fuel to the carb. At idle the fuel flow will be a trickle. In this situation the pump will just maintain the fuel pressure at the carb. As said if it aint broke.
            My car arrived in the UK in 1992 with a duff mechanical fuel pump. I replaced it with a repop one which lasted 3 months before stranding me at the road side. The second repop pump lasted about 6 weeks before I limped home at little more than tick over. Maybe repop mechanical pumps are better now but I had no confidence in them, hence going electric.
            Allan

            Comment


              #7
              Ford fitted every classic-era Mustang with a mechanical pump, so I'd stick with it. If you go electric, you will a) get noise and b) have to fit an impact or oil-pressure-switch operated cut-out to cover accidents. The beauty of a mechanical pump is that when the engine stops, the fuel pump stops. Not the case with electric - you don't want to be sitting unconscious in an overturned car with a pump emptying the tank over you. And as said above, if it ain't broke...
              My car's 393 stroker has run just fine with the Edelbrock mechanical pump I fitted 15 years ago, never missed a beat.

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by ALLAN R View Post
                The float needle valves control the flow of fuel to the carb. At idle the fuel flow will be a trickle. In this situation the pump will just maintain the fuel pressure at the carb. As said if it aint broke.
                My car arrived in the UK in 1992 with a duff mechanical fuel pump. I replaced it with a repop one which lasted 3 months before stranding me at the road side. The second repop pump lasted about 6 weeks before I limped home at little more than tick over. Maybe repop mechanical pumps are better now but I had no confidence in them, hence going electric.
                I should have said that with the revs right up, the petrol still appears to be flowing through at a trickle, even though it seems to run fine as in it doesn't cut out through lack of fuel as it looks like it might. When I let go of the throttle and let it idle, it spits a bit petrol into the filter and then returns to a trickle. Is that normal?

                Either way, I'll take everyone's advice and forget about the electric pump.

                Comment


                  #9
                  Well with a rough calculation of 18mpg that equates to 1/4 litre per mile - sounds like a trickle to me

                  '65 289 "A" Code GT Optioned Coupe, with 4spd Toploader and Arvinode exhaust - sounds great! :D :gears

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Yup, I'd go with the mechanical brigade. In all my years of driving I've never had a mech pump to fail; yes, they can get weak and the diaphragm can become porous, but they never seem to die completely - unlike elec ones. As to the apparent lack of fuel in the filter, I've seen this too but it doesn't seem to matter....

                    Comment

                    Working...
                    X