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Holley Carb - Cleaning

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    Holley Carb - Cleaning

    My car broke down coming off the motorway last weekend, AA came to my aid and was tinkering around with the carburetor, I saw fuel splash out of the top while trying to start at one point. He had a mate of his on the phone at the time (someone who knew his classics) and actually got it going after some gentle tapping on the side of the carb with hammer - maybe there was more but I don't think so.

    Once the car got going he set the idle high and just followed me home the last few miles. He reckons there's a build up in the carb stopping the float from working properly. He's suggested I can just get it cleaned.

    I like learning anything new with my car so I'm tempted to strip it down myself with an ex-vw/audi mechanic mate he's offering a helping hand but he has no Holley carb experience either.)

    Wondering is anyone can help to advise how technical this really is - I'm a quick learner but averse to wasting time and money on a fruitless exercise I don't want the equivalent of DIY-rescue to parachute in and fix it anyway at greater cost. Secondly who or what do I search for that will help me find the right person/garage?

    Carb is a Holley 1850-15 Street warrior - fitted to a 302w.

    Any guidance would be much appreciated.

    Cheers
    1969 302 Fastback

    #2
    Very easy to sort out, as you say, many times just hitting it with handle of a screwdriver would fix it but truth be told, re-fitting the fuel filters we had cleverly ditched would prevent it. Often some dirt will collect on the seat and stop it closing, so it floods. Remove the needle assembly carefully and inspect, you may see the offending junk. Be warned, once removed, the needle seat assembly will have to be 'set up' as it controls the fuel level in the carb (in conjunction with the float) and also be warned that you adjust with the nut, and lock with the screw. Brutality here will strip the threads in the float bowl and renewal is your only option then. HTH
    Cheers, Martin
    sigpic

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      #3
      As said, quite easy to do.
      Easier to remove the carb and do the work on a bench.
      Gazza

      "Understeer is when you hit the wall with the front of the car, oversteer is when you hit the wall with the rear of the car. Horsepower is how fast you hit the wall and torque is how far you take the wall with you"

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        #4
        Thanks, I'm going to give it a go. Carbs coming off today then I'll spend tomorrow tinkering.
        1969 302 Fastback

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          #5
          Don't forget you'll need some gaskets to put it back together again.
          1966 Mustang Hardtop - Trans-Am tribute in the making..
          1962 Chevy C-20 Fleetside
          1987 Peugeot 205 GTi track toy
          1974 Ford Econoline E100

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            #6
            All going well so far, taken the tank off the front, bit of much in there, dried white residue mostly but spraying it with a cleaner cleared that up and its shining again. I bought the kit in advance from Holley and there are new needles in there and all the gaskets I need too.

            Do you think replacing the front/&rear needles and cleaning the tanks is enough work for now - I don't know if I want to go much further because I'd rather my car was back on the road - I can properly mess about with the carb during the winter.

            I did have a moment of panic when I dropped the tiny mesh net thingy which was resting just inside the banjo, took a few minutes searching under my deck where I was working but I found it. (Looks like a tiny little bucket-shaped sieve used to capture dirt or muck before going into the bowl.)

            Martin - is it worth buying and fitting one of a filter to the fuel line - is there a known/common part I can use?

            Cheers for all the help guys
            1969 302 Fastback

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              #7
              Filters are always a good idea so adding one will help more than it hinders. There are common filters but I don't know what you would have locally, I have a farm shop near me and I just ask for the metal inline filters they sell. Couple of quid each. This is the type, but these are expensive (to me) : https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/RF1002-Me...0AAOSwPc9W1v2j
              Cheers, Martin
              sigpic

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                #8
                Thanks again Martin, I'll pick one up.

                So now I've cleaned the tanks, swapped out the needle assemblies, changed for new gaskets and put the Holley back on. Started her up after a few pumps of the pedal and she was purring - to adjust the needles I unscrewed the sight plug very slowly with the engine running, before the plug came out completely there was minimal fuel trickling out in small drops at a time and certainly not pouring out. I left it like that for now and I'll test drive the car tonight when the roads are clear and I don't risk bringing commuters to a standstill. I''ll take my spanners and screwdriver along for the drive.

                Any tips on what to look out for while driving if the needle adjustment is incorrect i.e. set too low vs too high, I assume she'll flood again if its too high?

                Cheers
                1969 302 Fastback

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                  #9
                  I set up float chambers (you call them tanks?) so that after running, shut off and remove sight plugs and fuel should just trickle out or if not, just bump the car sideways and if fuel spills out then I call it good. It should not pour out when the plugs are removed, too high. If you have set it too low, you may experience drivability issues, lack of response etc. Sounds to me like you have it about right already. Good luck!
                  Cheers, Martin
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                    #10
                    Thanks Martin - really appreciate your help with this, I'm always chuffed with another DIY win, no matter how modest.

                    1969 302 Fastback

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                      #11
                      Good on you for having a go! Fewer people willing to charge in and see what occurs these days but it's the only way to learn. Keep it up and you'll be an Expert soon enough!
                      Cheers, Martin
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