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    Over heated fuel

    Hello All
    Can anyone recommend the best product, & where to get it, for wrapping the fuel line to the carb, in order to keep the line a little cooler.
    I need to re route the line a little better, but at the same time i want to add some heat resistant sleeving.
    289 holley carb, mechanical pump.
    Out of curiosity, i understand the best practice for cooler fuel is to run electric pump with regulator & a return line back to the tank, therefore
    the fuel is constantly circulating within the lines.......has anyone ever fitted a return line to a standard 65 fuel tank??

    Many thanks,
    Andy

    #2
    I have run a return line to the tank on my 66. I emptied the tank and removed the sender unit and soldered the return pipe through the sender. Just be aware that your tank is able to breath in but not breath out. By that, I mean that there is a chance that over a long period of returning warm or hot fuel to your tank, the temperature in the tank will increase causing expansion. Its more exaggerated if your car is an EFI but still has an effect on carbureted cars. You can fit a one way valve or a fuel expansion canister, or you may just want to see how it pans out.

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      #3
      Thanks for the reply...what electric pump & regulator did you go for?

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        #4
        I don't have a flow and return on my car but I have an electric pump. Its an Airtex pump sold by Real Steel. They are nice and quiet, especially compared to the Holley pump. It is also regulated to give the correct fuel pressure for the Holley. I've had it on the car for over 10 years and no issues. This said I guess with the return system you will need a pump with a bit more pressure to compensate for the loss on the return side. I have fitted the fuel line to come across the firewall at the back of the engine and then a short length across the top of the engine to the carb. I've not had and fuel vapour problems.
        Allan

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          #5
          I have used a phenolic spacer between the carb and intake to help with heat soak as well.
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            #6
            Funk Motorsport sell heat management products
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              #7
              thanks for all your reply's......i suppose its down to the age old debate about mechanical or electric pump!....my mechanical is showing about
              4.5 psi...and once again there seems to be so much conflicting info about the minimum pressure a holley carb must have....but i dont think
              my issue was fuel pump related, as its been fine for years....it was the hottest day of the year & im sure it was over heated fuel that was causing
              the stumbling/cut out......

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                #8
                Are you still running a mechanical engine driven fan? Most vapor lock problems with modern ethanol blended fuels that I have run across are caused by the installation of electric cooling fans. As long as air is moving through the engine compartment at all times by means of an engine driven fan, it staves off a lot of ills in regards to the fuel system on vintage cars.

                In my youth I fitted electric fuel pumps and electric cooling fans to my cars, but after being a bit older and wiser I have reverted things back to the original configuration to find out it just works best to leave things as the engineers designed.
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                  #9
                  Originally posted by MeZapU View Post
                  Are you still running a mechanical engine driven fan? Most vapor lock problems with modern ethanol blended fuels that I have run across are caused by the installation of electric cooling fans. As long as air is moving through the engine compartment at all times by means of an engine driven fan, it staves off a lot of ills in regards to the fuel system on vintage cars.

                  In my youth I fitted electric fuel pumps and electric cooling fans to my cars, but after being a bit older and wiser I have reverted things back to the original configuration to find out it just works best to leave things as the engineers designed.
                  No modern car I know of has a fixed engine fan yet they don't seem to suffer with fuel vapourisation. All my old cars like Cortina's seemed to overheat as soon as we were stuck in traffic. My last carburetted engine was a 3 litre Granada and it had a recycling fuel system. Perhaps the engine compartment of older cars is designed for a circulating air system, but I noticed when the electric fan came on in my 65 Mustang and I was standing behind it that the air flow and the heat that came out was really intense. So I am not sure if the fan would be heating the engine ancillaries rather than cooling them. It might be good to fit an overide switch to the electric fan to run it continually.
                  Allan

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                    #10
                    If one has a manual [over-ride] electric fan switch..it might be an idea to use a DPDT switch...so that, when sat in traffic, instead of the fan sucking [or blowing] air from the hot radiator, into the engine bay ...reverse the polarity do the fan blows outwards?
                    Most Japanese cars from the 70's [with carbs] used re-circulating fuel systems...[just make sure the return pipe is smaller bore than the supply pipe?]..it's easy enough to rig up, and the amount being returned should not affect the temp of the fuel in the tank very much....if at all. The return pipe could be let into the fuel filler pipe, for example?

                    Maybe re-route any engine bay fuel lines away from major heat sources?
                    Modern engines have fuel returns, so don't boil the petrol head-end components.

                    Possibly try out smaller bore fuel lines [so the fuel is flowing faster in the lines?]
                    The book below is worth getting, to understand what is going on with todays petrol, and old fashioned engines like ours? it contains the results of tests conducted by Manchester University, on the effects of modern petrol, on old technology engines.
                    The results tabulated are worth a good study....there's no urban myth advice, either.

                    https://www.veloce.co.uk/store/Class...ons-p151478624

                    Can be had cheaper via other sources, but hey, you lot all have money to burn, apparently?? Will also put the lid on all the current ethanol scaremongering as well.

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