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    MOT Exempt

    Hi all I know this has been done loads of times but I'm thinking about exempting both my cars. I will instead pay to have the car inspected a bit more thorough.

    What do I need to do:

    My Mustang Tax due 01/01/2021 MOT due 03/01/2021
    My Corvette Tax due 14/08/2021 MOT due 18/10/2020

    The V5 has both cars as historic but not sure what to do next to exempt the cars.

    #2
    They are already mot exempt, when you tax them online it should give you a option to declare that it it is a historic and therefore MOT exempt, think you have to declare this every year you tax it. Seems silly to me but what do I know, I guess it just keeps the car on the system.

    Comment


      #3
      I've only taxed the corvette a few weeks ago and didn't get an exempt option as far as I can remember. I can only remember it being the same as when I tax my daily car.

      Typo Corvette taxed on 01/10/2020

      Comment


        #4
        The problem may be...if the car already has a current MoT test, then the tax can be acquired without the need to make a declaration for exemption. Exemption does not happen whilst there is a current MoT in place.

        When the MoT is ''due''..that is when the exemption is claimed [exemption as a VHI]. I guess ...if you do not 'bother ' with acquiring a new mot, then, come the next year [when the current MoT has run out] you will be able to make a declaration.

        The dodgy situation occurs in the intervening period.....no valid MoT, and not yet able to claim exemption? There used to be a 'letter' one could download from the FBHVC {?} website to print off and 'show' to anybody entitled to know, that although the existing MoT has expired, the car will eventually be declared exempt as a VHI.

        I doubt any Enforcing Authority will bother, however....

        If it really really really is a worry......then perhaps holding off 'taxing ' the cars for a month, [SORN instead, don't forget] until the MoT actually expires, will present you with a Declaration?
        My old Ford banger [sorry, Mustang!]...had this issue, as the MoT expired after tax was due....All now OK, however.
        The important thing is, make sure both cars are actually roadworthy, as in, the eyes of the Law [not someone's opinion!!]..when out on the road? That trumps any existing MoT certificate by a big margin!

        edit to add..the issue, or 'confusion', arises because it all involves two separate, and different, Government Agencies..the DVSA [which used to be VOSA and DSA].....and DVLA.....[who are solely responsible for tax collecting and driver licensing].

        Last edited by alastairq; 04-10-2020, 11:29 AM.

        Comment


          #5
          If you have any issues tax them at the Post Office.I know it's a pain but for getting the tax for free is worth it.Just take along your V5 and the V11.

          Comment


            #6
            OK so the Mustangs tax is due 1st January 2021 (MOT runs out 3 days later) so if I tax at the post office with a v11 I should then be ok taxing online in future years without an MOT?

            The corvettes tax is now due next August so I have no choice but to MOT this month and do the above when the tax is next due?

            Comment


              #7
              Why not SORN the Corvette the day the MOT is due and put it back on the road the next day applying for the free tax?
              Yes you should be able to do it online in the future

              Comment


                #8
                I just drove around with no mot and then declared when the tax was next due.

                Comment


                  #9
                  Seems so difficult but is probably easy really, so just took the C2 for an MOT, passed and I feel happier its had a check over. Might even keep MOTing the Mustang.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    The danger of the MoT is , folk come to rely on it as a measure of roadworthiness.....in the legal sense.
                    A near neighbour drives a summat-or-other...cannot tell what without studying the badge at close quarters...could be a BMW? Could be a Dacia?...Anyway...his O/S brake light, and one front side light, have been 'out' for some time now. As in, a month or two. [from when I first noticed them] I did my good-neighbour thing and informed him. His response was, the lights would be fixed when it goes for MoT..........next January!!!

                    My scurvy, made-this-century, cheep-az-chipz daily driver went for its MoT the other week..passed as well, with zero of those advisory things most folk ignore....
                    I had previously swapped a front tyre for the spare...which was a different size...as I suspected the not-quite smooth strip on the tyre's inside edge might be an inconvenience? As I said, it passed.....without comment on one tyre being a different size to the other three.
                    Since it now has an MoT and is deemed 'roadworthy', I swapped the tyres back that afternoon.....so I can get my money's worth out of the rest of the tyre's tread!
                    I mean...it's road legal now, it has a fresh MoT!!!! What's the worry?

                    I'll just avoid passing the big laybys that the Police and DVSA use for their spot check campaigns, simples!

                    The Mot test tells me there's nothing too dire to worry about for the foreseeable.
                    No that every oncoming vehicle is roadworthy, just because it has some test on it.

                    Still, with the MoT as it is, at least a car has a reasonable roadworthiness check once a year? At least, a new one gets the once-over after its first 3 years? That's a long time to go with a failed brake light or two?

                    Wow!



                    Off down to A&E now, got cramp in my tongue where it's been stuck in my cheek....

                    Comment


                      #11
                      This has been a bit of a hot topic of mine within the other motoring circle I am in - with the Capris. Many of them are now over 40yrs old and mine will be in 4 years time. So should I just exempt the tax or both tax and MOT ?

                      What Alastair has said is very true. An MOT is only as good as the hour that it was tested. It actually means nothing, even 1 hour after the test, let alone 3 months or later in that calendar duration. You could drive out of the MOT station and have a crash, that severely damages suspension parts, bodywork, lights etc. Would it now pass the MOT ?

                      It is merely an annual check and the quality at the time of the test just shows it is fit for the road, not fit for the road subsequent to that test - although, in likelihood (but not always) it might be.

                      (Your neighbour, Alastair, is in for a tug if he is seen and they will give him notice to have this done - so it is a little unwise of him/her to drive around without a light working. I know that many do but sometimes this sort of thing catches up with someone).

                      So this MOT exemption would be something that many people, once their car gets to 40, they would act on ? I believe it is but I was surprised by the response of the Capri owners. Very few do. They don't enable the exemption and they trudge off down the MOT station every year to have their 48 yr old old banger tested, what parts of the test are now applicable.

                      Let's be honest, as has been said, a test is a 1 hour on one day in a year. That is all. And it is a legal document.

                      But service history stands further than the test itself. And I guess that this is true. Something that blind sided me as well.

                      I just thought that I would get the exemption. But it now has me thinking. If I was ever to sell, once in this >40yr zone, how would I prove the vehicle is road worthy ?

                      OK, my initial thought was to have a mock test done - so still take the car down there and have the test done but no document for legality. So I spend 50 on a test that isn't a test as I have no record of the actual pass (or fail). What's the use of that, other than I can continue to drive the car that failed the mock test vs one that failed a real test ?

                      I don't know. I am still betwixed and between. I think I'll continue to have the real tests done and then it proves, if ever I sell, that I have followed the book and that stands in good stead for its value. But then, if it unearths soem major work, that could send me backwards as I now need to spend out, possibly, a fortune. But then morally, should you be running a motor on the road that is not fit for the road ?

                      Oh the dilemma.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Originally posted by Daz-RSK View Post
                        This has been a bit of a hot topic of mine within the other motoring circle I am in - with the Capris. Many of them are now over 40yrs old and mine will be in 4 years time. So should I just exempt the tax or both tax and MOT ?

                        What Alastair has said is very true. An MOT is only as good as the hour that it was tested. It actually means nothing, even 1 hour after the test, let alone 3 months or later in that calendar duration. You could drive out of the MOT station and have a crash, that severely damages suspension parts, bodywork, lights etc. Would it now pass the MOT ?

                        It is merely an annual check and the quality at the time of the test just shows it is fit for the road, not fit for the road subsequent to that test - although, in likelihood (but not always) it might be.

                        (Your neighbour, Alastair, is in for a tug if he is seen and they will give him notice to have this done - so it is a little unwise of him/her to drive around without a light working. I know that many do but sometimes this sort of thing catches up with someone).

                        So this MOT exemption would be something that many people, once their car gets to 40, they would act on ? I believe it is but I was surprised by the response of the Capri owners. Very few do. They don't enable the exemption and they trudge off down the MOT station every year to have their 48 yr old old banger tested, what parts of the test are now applicable.

                        Let's be honest, as has been said, a test is a 1 hour on one day in a year. That is all. And it is a legal document.

                        But service history stands further than the test itself. And I guess that this is true. Something that blind sided me as well.

                        I just thought that I would get the exemption. But it now has me thinking. If I was ever to sell, once in this >40yr zone, how would I prove the vehicle is road worthy ?

                        OK, my initial thought was to have a mock test done - so still take the car down there and have the test done but no document for legality. So I spend 50 on a test that isn't a test as I have no record of the actual pass (or fail). What's the use of that, other than I can continue to drive the car that failed the mock test vs one that failed a real test ?

                        I don't know. I am still betwixed and between. I think I'll continue to have the real tests done and then it proves, if ever I sell, that I have followed the book and that stands in good stead for its value. But then, if it unearths soem major work, that could send me backwards as I now need to spend out, possibly, a fortune. But then morally, should you be running a motor on the road that is not fit for the road ?

                        Oh the dilemma.
                        Just let the old MoT run out and then tax it when the tax is due and you should have the option. If that doesn't work for some reason go to the post office.

                        I think it depends on your ability to check the car's safety features as per the MoT. If you don't know one end of the car from the other then it is best to get it tested and checked annually. If you are ok at doing work on your car then I don't think having it MoT'd is necessary. I am a little concerned in the car being subject to some new legislation if it is not documented as VHI and also the whole VHI thing being dropped if people don't use it.I think my car is in better condition now than when it had an MoT because I now feel it is entirely down to me. Fortunately a 65 Mustang is so simple to work on, and parts so available, that I can fix dodgy suspension joints, steering and brakes quickly and easily. The rest of the MoT like lights, windscreen wipers, horn, visual check/function of seat belts, condition of tyres and anything else like that is easy to do oneself, so why pay someone to do something that can easily be done at home.
                        Allan

                        Comment


                          #13
                          I think its the same old story, yes you can lose a brake light etc as soon as you leave the station but rusty brake pipes holes in floor or chassis don't happen over night. its those big faults that might be missed or ignored by the DIYer. Most of us only do a few hundred miles a year in our classics so I'm happy that the MOT is good on most things as it is on my modern cars.... + we are car nuts so do look after things on a daily basis anyway.

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Something that may be of concern regarding the mot test issue, is that I know many vehicle owners use the test as a means of only doing what is strictly necessary to meet the test criteria.
                            They don't actually look any further or deeper than is absolutely necessary.
                            With older vehicles, looking deeper into the condition is probably more important than with a 4 year old car.
                            This, from someone who discovered his driver's side rear brake pipe....from flexi to left drum, had at some point come into contact with something that had put a fair sized flat into the pipe. Probably a badly aimed angle grinder? Seeing as how near the exhaust is? This was partly hidden under underseal and road dirt......and been missed by 2 mots, closely timed together. An easy enough fix, but it made me wonder? I had asked for a fresh MOT when I bought the car. Good old Rockauto has allowed me to put right some reet cobbles!
                            On the question of being pulled for failure to maintain? This seems highly unlikely to occur these days.
                            Back in my early driving days, (1960s/70s) , to take one's banger wheels out on a Friday night with a tail light out was asking to be pulled over.
                            I suspect nowadays the powers that be are happy to sit and wait for the ANPR to ping?
                            Last edited by alastairq; 19-10-2020, 07:30 AM.

                            Comment


                              #15
                              I see what you all are saying. I also stand by the fact that the test is just the minimum requirement for the vehicle to be road worthy - it is not the be all, end all. The vehicles should be looked after all through the year, not just on the day of the test. And then, the test isn't that conclusive - it is just a set of disciplines as a basic guide.

                              I would say that I am reasonably competent around a vehicle. I won't strip an engine or g/box. But suspension, engine ancillary stuff, brakes - most of that stuff, I am fairly good with.

                              Where the MOT has its advantages though - and something I don't have - is a set of rollers for the brakes. Nor do I have a tapley meter. I know the brakes are effective or not. But I don't know they would pass a test or not on each individual wheel, without a test. Front wheels are easier to spot than rear, as that is where 75% of braking is and would have some feedback through the steering wheel.

                              Now, as you all say, using your car to travel 2000/3000 miles per annum, it's hardly a great issue. As long as the brakes are effective and pull the vehicle up.

                              But what if it was wet on route home from the show and the line of traffic pulls up hard in front of you, you press the brake, one wheel being a little ineffective and being over compensated by another, the car skids into the rear of the vehicle in front. Insurance assessor is brought out to investigate the "quality " of your car and then there is some discussion as to how you verified that your brakes were in perfect order.

                              That's the sort of thing I am a bit concerned with. That's why I wouldn't rule out the annual check and going through the paces of the test. Whether I receive the official notice or a pat of the back that it has past, I don't know. That's where I am at.

                              The other is emissions testing to the MOT requirements. I don't have that sort of analyser kicking around either. In fairness, if you think through the test, there is lot that you can do. But these are fundamentals that can't be done and I wasn't thinking of buying an analyser and a set of rollers for testing my motors, in case they become over 40yrs old.

                              I know that emissions is something that is a bit lost as, when we talk of older motors, what is clean and what is really clean ? But there are standards and without having a nose for emissions - which cologne fragrance is it today ? - you wouldn't know your car's ability. For me, it's not just polluting the street. The MOT emissions test tells you a little of the running health of the vehicle.

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