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1966 steering slop

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  • EddieCross
    replied
    Steering Box Centring:
    ...Didn't read the whole thread so please ignore if covered already....

    1. Disconnect pitman arm from the steering gear at the ball joint
    2. Wind steering wheel to full left. Count turns and mark position on column
    3. mark steering wheel full right count turns and mark on column
    4. count back turns to 1/2 position and mark column and steering wheel. Recheck
    5. Recenre steering wheel on column if you need to
    6. Mark everything- Rag joint to steering box, steering wheel to column etc.

    Everything starts from there.

    Cheers
    Eddie

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  • Sawyles
    replied
    That’s what I did lots of care and plenty of padding, I had the fenders off when I did mine

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  • codm80FB
    replied
    i think it is very much luck of the draw how easy/hard it will be to fit, maybe I need to borrow your 4x2! At least I have 4 months until next season to get it done

    only concern about jacking the towers apart is damage to paintwork/local deformation of the panels, I can only think of putting soft padding at any push points and spreading the load as much as possible.
    Last edited by codm80FB; 04-11-2020, 11:33 AM.

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  • Sawyles
    replied
    I had to ‘massage’ my strut towers a little to get the export brace in. Piece of 4x2 and a small bottle jack did the trick. Needed the carb off to do it though, just take your time, moved it about 3/4” not as bad as the link below

    https://youtu.be/Ax-fpGsJmig

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  • ALLAN R
    replied
    Originally posted by codm80FB View Post
    i intent to fit an export brace this winter as well i am hoping the strut tops are not too misalignment to align the holes!
    Well best of luck. Initially when you try you may well think that there is a big error but these cars do move a lot over their lifetime. This said they do respond to a bit of "manipulation"

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  • codm80FB
    replied
    i intent to fit an export brace this winter as well i am hoping the strut tops are not too misalignment to align the holes!

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  • ALLAN R
    replied
    It sounds like the geometry has been set ok. If you suspect something with the cars "straightness" you could do some measuring but I've been told that these cars were never as accurately made as modern jigged up cars, so you may find some minor alignment errors anyway. I fitted an export brace and Monte Carlo bar to my car. I found I had to jack the strut tops apart by about 1/4 in and also hang the front on axle stands to get the brace bolt holes to align. The car had sagged quite a bit over its 50 years. Since doing this the car has felt stiffer. This said I don't think the bodies on these cars are very rigid anyway.

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  • codm80FB
    replied
    I did the caster /camber /toe in adjustment 18 months ago when I sorted out the rear axle issue takes some time fitting the shims then measuring--a nice winter job. Any am now pretty happy with that setup (measured to be camber -1.25 / caster + 4 deg/ toe in 3mm).
    Unfortunately I have no history on the car and although the restoration job prob done several years ago looks good , there is a few minor topics that suggest it is not perfect and "tuning" is required.
    BTW for the horn contact on the steering wheel hub(grant) what type of grease is used (mine was dry and contact surface is badly worn as a result (replacement on order). I was thinking to use a lithium multi purpose type (non conductive).

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  • ALLAN R
    replied
    That's a nice bit of rear wheel steering then.

    Yes modern cars with rack and pinion steering feel very different. There is much more of a "dead" bit in the centre of the classic Mustang steering. You just need to be moving the steering wheel across this dead area to keep the car straight. For a period of several months my classic was my only car. When I got another modern car I kept over steering and it felt way too pointy. It doesn't sound as if there is too much wrong but over the years the geometry of the suspension and steering changes or gets changed through maintenance. There are packer pieces behind the bolts that hold the upper control arms to the shock tower. These packers adjust both camber and caster angle and both adjustments are sensitive to a few degrees. Originally the cars were set up with almost zero camber and just a degree or two of caster, ok for the cross ply (biased ply) tyres of the day. Now with wider radial tyres I think you need about one degree of negative camber and around four degrees of positive caster. That is why I suggested an alignment shop. Its not an easy job to do because the upper control arm has the spring pressure against it so changing the packers is a PITA.

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  • codm80FB
    replied
    good pointer, all lower front end looks fairly new but worth checking.

    I think my biggest problem is I have no reference as to what it should be. Modern cars are so much better and bare no resemblance to 60's technology of the time.

    I still believe that steering box was never correctly set up, maybe you might recall that my car used to pull to the left, turned out that the rear axles was not locating on the leaf spring spigots due to lowering blocks no reaching the recess on the axle, this resulted in the wheel base left to right had 10mm difference!!

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  • ALLAN R
    replied
    A lot of the time wondering around on the road is due to alignment issues. If these suspensions are set up well they are not too bad. I have found one problem area to be the idler arm bush. This bush can feel ok but if you turn the steering when the car is stationary you might find that the arm moves up and down a lot rather than just turning right to left. This means that the front wheels are not steering precisely in the same direction. I have had to change the arm on mine twice since I've had the car.

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  • codm80FB
    replied
    Maybe it helps but not sure if I can get enough heat on due to the heat sink of the box. I think I will also try to get a hook wrench on it, maybe I am lucky and I have enough space!.I think part of the problem is the box (which I assume has been refurbished) was repainted when car was restored, and the paint itself probably is acting a a thread lock as well.
    I may end up leaving it as it is for the moment.
    I have improved the centering of wheels to be in line with the tightest point of the box as well as setting the sector gear engagement pre-load closer to where is should be, so this certainly help. The car is certainly driveable but it is now more of a wish to improve where improvements are still possible.

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  • ALLAN R
    replied
    You could try a little heat, but not to much. It might just expand the nut a little to break it free.

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  • codm80FB
    replied
    It is actually the adjuster nut locking ring that needs to be first slackened off which I am have an issue, once loose I should be able to adjust the nut to change the preload on the input shaft bearing (currently seems too low).
    Ideally I know I should use a hook wrench (which I don't have) but there seems limited space to slacken this off with such a wrench without removing the box from the vehicle. I have tried a drift and hammer approach to no available.

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  • ALLAN R
    replied
    Essentially this steering box is quite simple. The first adjustment to do is the input shaft bearing pre-load. This to me should be done with the pittman arm detached from the steering and the adjuster nut for the sector shaft backed right off. to lift the sector shaft out of the tight meshing with the input shaft. If you go to disassemble the box you will find that the adjuster nut on top of the box is threaded into the cover of the box so to remove the cover one should first undo and remove the adjuster nut locknut then undo and remove the cover retaining nuts. To remove the cover screw the adjuster nut through the cover. The adjuster nut fits in a slot on top of the sector shaft, so by screwing it either way it can both lift or push down the sector shaft. It has some shims which controls its play in the slot of the sector shaft. With this adjustment backed off it is possible to tighten or loosen the end nut on the input shaft to get the correct input shaft preload which ensures the correct end play on the input shaft, which is essentially zero. The way the sector shaft is manufactured gives two things. The gear teeth are tapered so the further the sector shaft is pushed down the tighter the mesh with the input shaft. Also the centre teeth of the sector shaft are ground so they mesh tighter with the input shaft than the teeth on the extremity of the sector shaft. This gives the tight centre portion of the box to provide more positive steering at zero steering lock.
    It sounds as if the input shaft nut of your steering box is jammed on rather tight. Some have a lock washer or tab washer. Make sure you have released any tabs. If your car is manual steering it may well have a worn box by now and I don't think there is much that one can do to rectify this other than a rebuilt box.

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