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Wanted Spot welder hire/ sale or borrow

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  • Sawyles
    replied
    Well after much consideration and then forgetting all about it, a conversation with a work colleague yielded a freebie ‘borrow as long as you like’ spot welder. Yet to try it out but I’ll post my findings

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  • Sawyles
    replied
    Yeah you’re probably right on that one, guess I’m getting lazy in my old age lol

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  • EddieCross
    replied
    I would go manual. No experience of this tool but DA Sander and Impact wrench have been gathering dust for years as my puny 14cfm 150 litre compressor couldn't drive them for more than a few minutes.

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  • Sawyles
    replied
    I was looking at the pneumatic ones but not sure there’s enough throat on them
    https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/373118105665

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  • EddieCross
    replied
    I have a cheap version of this hole punch. Works well for punching holes for plug welding

    https://www.frost.co.uk/imperial-han...ole-punch-kit/


    Eddie


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  • Sawyles
    replied
    As always sage advice from you guys.

    thanks

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  • Sawyles
    replied
    Sounds like there’s the right way and the easy way, I must admit hadn’t thought of the hole punch I’ll have a mooch on eBay and crack the mig up.

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  • JBGT50
    replied
    Originally posted by richard View Post
    I wouldn't risk those hand held spot welders. That's not what you see in a car factory.

    You don't need to drill holes, get a sheet metal hole punch and plug weld it with the mig, that way you're certain it's not coming apart.

    Those cheap spot welders are great for simulating factory spots after you've ground down the the plug weld.
    I agree mate the ones we used had huge air pressure to clamp and then arc and if ever the pressure dropped even slightly the welds failed. I couldn’t imagine that the industry had moved on so much in 15years where it hadn’t years before but wasn’t sure . Lotus use a special resin glue on there chassis which is tried and tested as another option. A friend who owns a track car used it on his front wings and said he would definitely use it again. I personally would stick with good old fashioned Co2 mig

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  • richard
    replied
    I wouldn't risk those hand held spot welders. That's not what you see in a car factory.

    You don't need to drill holes, get a sheet metal hole punch and plug weld it with the mig, that way you're certain it's not coming apart.

    Those cheap spot welders are great for simulating factory spots after you've ground down the the plug weld.

    Leave a comment:


  • JBGT50
    replied
    Looking at the hand held devices they have tapered top and bottom tips and could be up for the job( but can’t recommend strongly enough to perform the chisel tests) especially with it being your car )

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  • JBGT50
    replied
    Just checked and I was right at around 4-5mm tip for what you want

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  • JBGT50
    replied
    Typical minimum weld strength values (shear to failure) for low carbon steel of 280 N/mm˛ minimum tensile strength.
    Sheet thickness mm Nominal 3.5t weld size Nominal 4√t weld size Nominal 5√t weld size Nominal 6√t weld size
    Weld diameter mm Weld strength kN Weld diameter mm Weld strength kN Weld diameter mm Weld strength kN Weld diameter mm Weld strength kN
    0.6 2.7 1.3 3.1 1.6 3.9 2.0 4.6 2.3
    0.8 3.1 2.3 3.6 3.0 4.5 3.6 5.4 4.2
    1.0 3.5 3.2 4.0 3.7 5.0 4.3 6.0 5.1
    1.2 3.8 4.1 4.4 4.6 5.5 5.4 6.6 6.2
    1.6 4.4 5.5 5.1 6.0 6.3 7.4 7.6 8.3
    2.0 5.0 7.2 5.7 8.4 7.1 10.8 8.5 13.0
    2.5 5.5 10.6 6.3 11.8 7.9 14.5 9.5 17.3
    3.0

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  • JBGT50
    replied
    Having used industrial resistance welders (spot and Seam) They also use air pressure to clamp the two surfaces together directly during the welding process between the two electrodes ( the bottom being flat and the top being cylinder tapered to an appropriate point usually around 4mm. Once the operator presses the pedal usually the top arm of the welder comes down and clamps the two surfaces together creating an arc the size of the end of the taper thus creating the spot weld.The main method for verification of spot weld quality is destructive testing, where-by spot welds are torn apart Placing a test piece the same thickness in a vice and usually a sharp metal chisel to break the two surfaces apart ( WHICH THE METAL SHOULD TEAR) around the weld and only then do you have the correct pressure and voltage set . Because of this the ones I have used have always been quite large fixed machines liquid cooled as overheated tips causes weld failure.Things might have moved on in the last 15 years but in my experience the small hand held spot welders wouldn’t have had the grunt needed to weld panels back into a vehicle they were used primarily for small ornamental and household appliances. Pm me if you want any more info by all means I will send you my number and we can have a chat.
    Last edited by JBGT50; 06-08-2020, 05:08 PM. Reason: I misspelled two and the spelling policeman would have had his 2 pence worth

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  • Sawyles
    replied
    Cool

    the prospect of drilling all those holes on the cowl to plug weld them back up again, well let’s just say I hoped there was an easier way. Saw a few portable spot welders for sale on eBay
    just wondered if they were any good

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  • JBGT50
    replied
    Originally posted by Sawyles View Post
    Also I’d be intrigued if anyone’s used one?
    I have indeed mate what would you like to know ( Mig - seam welder-Spot welder and Stick ( not Tig however never had the patience needed)

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